A Typical Day for a Project Officer in North West Wales – Part Two

As the previous post demonstrated, new technology has bugs (or big file sizes)! So, with that in mind, let’s try again 🙂

The late 14th Century Alabaster Tomb of Goronwy ap Tudur and his wife Myfanwy

The late 14th Century Alabaster Tomb of Goronwy ap Tudur and his wife Myfanwy.

Here is a still from the 3D model. It’s very exciting to work with new technology. As someone who’s first excavation was 21 years ago I love seeing how archaeologists can use all these new tools to aid in their every day workload.

As an example, I was recently part of an Open Day organised by Cadw  (@cadwwales on Twitter) at a medieval site on Anglesey called Llys Rhosyr. The Trust attends events like this, and the Anglesey Agricultural Show mentioned previously as part of our remit as an educational charity. Whilst I was there I was interviewed on ‘Periscope’ and you can view the interview here: https://www.periscope.tv/w/1mrxmbVqvZZKy

Gwynedd Archaeological Trust (@GwyneddArch on Twitter) were responsible for excavating Llys Rhosyr in the mid 1990s, and a reconstruction of two of the buildings uncovered is currently being completed at the St Fagans National History Museum near Cardiff and two of the Trust staff – myself included – were on the advisory panel the Museum assembled to ensure the buildings were as accurate as possible inside and out.

A Reconstruction Drawing of Llys Rhosyr, a Welsh Medieval Llys (Court), Anglesey

A Reconstruction Drawing of Llys Rhosyr, a Welsh Medieval Llys (Court), Anglesey. Excavated by Gwynedd Archaeological Trust staff in the 1990s.

After working on the display boards for the morning, this afternoon I have administrative tasks to carry out. As a Project Officer within the Contract or commercial arm of the Trust, I sit between the Project Archaeologists below me, and the Senior Archaeologists and the Principal Archaeologist above. This is never glamorous, but is necessary. In no particular order so far this afternoon I’ve proof read two tender documents for projects in Denbighshire and Conwy the Trust is bidding for; put new vehicle insurance details in the Trust vehicles so staff have them if they need them; updated our Contract Report Library Database and helped one of our Project Archaeologists with some post-excavation work from our Community Archaeology excavation that happened recently: http://www.heneb.co.uk/heddyrynys/blog.html

There is always plenty of variety when you reach this level in your career. In addition to the fieldwork component, where one of my last jobs was to watch the excavation of replica World War I practice trenches to ensure they didn’t encounter any archaeology, I’ve been able to use my experience to turn to new opportunities.

Replica World War I practice trenches being constructed

Replica World War I practice trenches being constructed within post-medieval parkland.

On Monday I’ll be working in my other role as Trust Liaison Officer for the Portable Antiquities Scheme (@findsorguk on Twitter). Each of the four Welsh Archaeological Trusts has a TLO, and they report to the Welsh Finds Liaison Officer who is based in the National Museum Wales in Cardiff. I work two days a month, usually consecutively, in order to identify and process any finds which are brought in as part of the scheme.

The Photography set-up for Portable Antiquities Scheme recording

The Photography set-up for Portable Antiquities Scheme recording within the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust

This usually involves me working in a little photographic studio set up on the top floor of the building. In here I can light finds correctly to take clear photographs, both for our records here at the Trust, but also for inclusion on the Portable Antiquities Scheme (with the Record ID prefix GAT). Items can range from very degraded, broken or abraded items which are difficult to identify, through to this item, which was found complete, on a beach on the Lleyn Peninsula a few months ago.

Complete bronze cauldron, probably medieval in date, handed in as part of the Portable Antiquities Scheme

Complete bronze cauldron, probably medieval in date, handed in as part of the Portable Antiquities Scheme to the Gwynedd Archaeological Trust for recording.

For the remainder of today, I’ll carry on with the Contract Report Library Database to ensure all our records are as accurate as possible and that reports can be found easily when required. Please follow the Trust on social media, you’ll find us here:

Twitter @GwyneddArch

Facebook 

and our website provides information on the services we offer and how you can volunteer and get involved with the work of the Trust: http://www.heneb.co.uk/