Hi, I'm the Professor of Archaeology and Heritage at Prifysgol Bangor University's School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology. I did my degrees at the University of Vienna, Austria, and moved to Bangor (via a one and a half year stint in Aberystwyth) in 2003. My primary interests in archaeology are the European late Bronze and Iron Ages (up through the Roman period into the early Medieval period in what I consider the 'long' Iron Age of Northwestern Europe), primarily social archaeology, settlement and landscape of 'Celtic' Europe; archaeological theory and method; public archaeology; and particularly the role of archaeology in modern society; as well as archaeological heritage management.

A day of digging in Wales

The Bangor University team digging at Meillionydd (near Rhiw, on the Llyn peninsula in Northwest Wales).

The Bangor University team digging at Meillionydd (near Rhiw, on the Llyn peninsula in Northwest Wales).

Today, Prifysgol Bangor University’s team, a number of local volunteers and I were digging in the late Bronze and Iron Age double ringwork enclosure at Meillionydd (near Rhiw, on the Llyn peninsula in Northwest Wales). Incidentally, if you are interested to learn more about what is going on on site, you can follow us on Twitter @Meillionydddig or on facebook (https://www.facebook.com/meillionydddig) or indeed check our University website (http://meillionydd.bangor.ac.uk/) for more details about the dig.

Altogether (leaving aside some morning sea fog), it was a lovely day, if a wee bit hot at almost 23 degrees centigrade (for the Llyn, that is quite warm) – which most archaeologists in more southerly climates would probably consider a wonderfully cool and pleasant day out on site. Digging in such weather, particularly on a research dig like ours, is real good fun: whether digging some features or recording them, there is always something exciting to be discovered (even if it isn’t always finds as such which are the most interesting bits).