Conservation at the British Museum, Ceramics, Glass & Metals Section

Student shows visiting tutor her work on a coin hoard

Student shows visiting tutor her work on a coin hoard

Duygu Camurcuoglu working on ceramics for the Ur Digitisation project.

Duygu Camurcuoglu working on ceramics for the Ur Digitisation project.

Filling out Standard Operational procedure forms

Filling out Standard Operational procedure forms

First day of working on antiquities in our new workshop

First day of working on antiquities in our new workshop

Bee hives on the roof of the WCEC building

Bee hives on the roof of the WCEC building

WCEC building 6 floors above ground 3 floors below

WCEC building 6 floors above ground 3 floors below

All of the British Museum Conservation and Scientific Research Department have now moved into the WCEC building on the side of the British Museum site. (Except the eastern pictorial art people who remain in their traditional studio.)

Our new workshops are at the top of the building.

Other people in the Museum used to joke that it was only the bees in the hive on top of the roof that did any work in WCEC.

However, this week we got security clearance to start having antiquities in our workshop and we are all delighted to get back to doing our real work.

We do not yet have access to our full armoury of chemical might, but we are cleared to do manual cleaning. The task of filling out the Standard Operational Procedure forms for all of the rooms and equipment has only just begun.

In the morning of The Day of Archaeology, our student intern Suzanne van Leeuwen is visted by her tutor Tonny Beentjes (University of Amsterdam). She is able to show him coins she has been working on for the Treasure process.

Our move into WCEC has created a great back log of practical work and we are 4 coin hoards behind.

Later in the morning, Duygu Camurcuoglu continues her work on the Ur Digitisation project with colleagues from the Department of the Middle East. She has been preparing ceramic items for digitisation so that they can be included in web avaible account of excavations at Ur. It is a joint project with Penn Museum and it is hoped that, in the future, the Irag Museum in Baghdad will be involved as well.

In the afternoon, one technologically inept conservator tries to give a Powerpoint presentation about coin conservation to a numismatic summer school and later tries to upload all this onto the Day of Archaeology site.

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Conservation at the British Museum, Ceramics, Glass & Metals Section by Day of Archaeology, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

3 thoughts on “Conservation at the British Museum, Ceramics, Glass & Metals Section

  1. Wonderful to see some photos of the fantastic new conservation space at the BM, and glimpse of range of activities happening on Day of Archaeology 2014 – congratulations and hope you thoroughly enjoy your new space !!!

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