Stay-at-Home Archaeologist

All archaeologists don’t get to work in archaeology.  For my part, I’m a stay-at-home mom.  I would love to be working, digging, or researching, but I haven’t been able to find a job.  In my experience, having a PhD has made it harder to find a job since there are fewer and fewer academic opportunities, and I am ‘overqualified’ for CRM or other types of archaeological work.  And so, on a daily basis, I do little or no archaeology at all.

Mini archaeologists playing in the dirt!

Mini archaeologists playing in the dirt!

After getting up and having breakfast, I might have some time to write some emails and check job listings, then it’s off to the park or the museum, laundry, lunch, and then the blessed nap time.  During nap time, I might get 45 min to apply for jobs and postdocs, or work on publishing articles from my thesis.  After that, it’s back to the mayhem, with my two girls (4.5 and 17 months) off and running.  Some nights I might get another hour or two in the evening.

Mini palaeontologist at the museum!

Mini palaeontologist at the museum!

Twitter provides most of my archaeology connection these days.  I am able to follow current news and finds even though I don’t have time to keep up with the literature.  It also provides the encouragement and collegial support required to keep going in face of deafening silence from the many many job applications I have sent out.

I hope that by next year I will actually be doing some archaeology on the Day of Archaeology. My kids will be old enough that I might be willing to leave them behind to go back to the Middle East (or somewhere else!) to dig.  I might even have a job!

Alexis McBride

@lexmcbride