A Day in the Summer of Michilimackinac 300

I am the Curator of Archaeology for Mackinac State Historic Parks, and my primary responsibility in the summer is to direct the archaeological excavation at Michilimackinac.  This is the third year we have participated in Day of Archaeology, and we are still excavating at the same site, a fur traders’ house at Michilimackinac.  The house is one unit of a five unit rowhouse, built in the 1730s, rebuilt in the 1760s and demolished in 1781.  It was lived in by fur traders, first a French-Canadian, Charles Gonneville, and later an English fur trader, name as yet unknown.

Two of us were working on postmolds from the 1760s south wall of the house today.

Two postmolds are visible in this image.  The top one still has some wood visible in it.

Two postmolds are visible in this image. The top one still has some wood visible in it.

The other feature we were excavating today was much more recent, two concrete piers from old-fashioned stocks that were an interactive display inside the walls of Fort Michilimackinac in 1960-1961.

These two concrete piers are the remains of stocks from a c.1960 display of colonial punishment devices.

These two concrete piers are the remains of stocks from a c.1960 display of colonial punishment devices.

Our site is in the middle of Colonial Michilimackinac State Historic Park and we are surrounded by live interpretive programming every day.  This summer we are celebrating the tricentennial of Michilimackinac with a series of themed weekends.  This weekend’s theme is Robert Rogers of the Rangers.  As part of the celebration, our regular interpretive staff was joined by re-enactors from Jaeger’s Battalion of Rogers’ Rangers and the Massachusetts Provincial Battalion.

French and Indian War-era re-enactors participating in the opening color ceremony.

French and Indian War-era re-enactors participating in the opening color ceremony.