3D

Hard night’s Day of Archaeology

Editing the mesh of a photogrammetric model of a kiln

I’m up late editing the mesh of a photogrammetric model of a kiln, recorded on site two weeks ago. This week my evening routine has consisted of watching progress bars inching along until another stage of the rendering is complete; then initiating the next 24 hours of processing before finally nodding off. The demands on processor power are immense but there’s no question that it’s worth it. The level of detailed recording photogrammetric models make available is almost unprecedented, and as with all things computer-related it’s only going to get faster and easier.

Soon this feature’s going to be backfilled but, with the aid of a mobile phone, laptop or cheap VR headset, anyone will be able to take a look around it. My kids have already ‘stood’ in the bottom of the kiln and taken a look around.

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Anyway, back to the progress bar – only another 1h 12m 45s till bedtime.

Sustaining the practice of archaeology in Ontario, Canada

This is our 3rd year participating in Day of Archaeology, and we are excited, once again, to be joining our colleagues in this virtual space to share with you some of the diverse experiences archaeologists have over the course of a regular day.

This year, we want to focus on the sorts of technology we have available here at Sustainable Archaeology: Western University. Most of the equipment in our new facility is for non-destructive image capture and analysis: 3D scanners, 3D printer, digital x-ray, microCT scanner, etc. We are fortunate, as archaeologists, to have a single location with dedicated access to equipment such as this! On any given day, several pieces of equipment will be in use by different researchers. Today, a couple of a staff members – Hillary and Heather – have been working on chipping away the outer “envelope” of a 3D printed cuneiform tablet to reveal the inner tablet for the first time in over 4,000 years! But to explain how we got to this point, let’s start from the beginning.

Cuneiiform tablet_small

Sustainable Archaeology was built adjacent to the Museum of Ontario Archaeology in London, Ontario, Canada. The Museum houses a variety of collections, predominantly from Ontario but there are some international antiquities that were acquired by the mid-20th century curator of the Museum, including a small collection of cuneiform tablets. One of those tablets was suspected to be an Old Babylonian “envelope” tablet – a cuneiform tablet nested inside of a cuneiform tablet. But how to tell without breaking the tablet open? Sustainable Archaeology had a solution – we scanned the tablet in the microCT scanner. Sure enough, there was evidence that another tablet was enfolded within the outer layer of clay – and it appeared to have cuneiform writing on it as well!

cuneiform envelope 009_mCT

With microCT imaging software, VG Studio, Hillary painstakingly ‘excavated’, or peeled-off, the outer layer of clay. This was a tricky process, because CT images differentiate material based on the density of voxels in a 3D dimensional space – metal, for instance, is much more dense and thus appears much ‘whiter’ than wood. But the clay ‘envelope’ was the same density as the enclosed clay tablet – so selecting which voxels to digitally peel-away from the region of interest was a labour intensive process. Hillary was able to do this because there was a slight void between the clay surfaces. This lead us to an idea – if we 3D printed the tablet, would the void still be intact? In which case, wouldn’t we be able to break the outer tablet off of the inner tablet?

So for our second experiment, we did just that. We digitally cut the cuneiform tablet in half, so we could see the inside structure(s), and we we printed off that cuneiform half on the 3D printer. Sure enough, the void was there – but it was very thin. In order to create more void space – an area that would be filled with printer powder but no binder would be laid down – we scaled up the size of the tablet to double its original size. Then we printed it off and got to work chipping off the external ‘envelope’ – to reveal a clear, sharp cuneiform surface on the embedded tablet. Success!

tablet_excavating

tablet_excavated

 

We are constantly envisioning ways that the equipment we have here at SA can complement one another. Colin is next door in the Collaboration Room with the Virtual Reality equipment. He is working on an application that allows us to digitally pick up, move, throw and stack digital assets that we’ve scanned on our 3D scanners (such as pots!) within a virtual reality space. This way, as you are immersed within a virtual reconstruction of a Lawson site longhouse, such as that created by Western PhD candidate Michael Carter, while wearing a set of 3D goggles such as Oculus Rift of HTC Vive, you will also be able to digitally engage with objects within that virtual space.

For more information on what we do at Sustainable Archaeology, check out our website at www.sustainablearchaeology.org. You can also follow us on Instagram @sustarchaeology or Twitter @SustArchaeology.

Archaeology from the depths of the Delaware River to high atop Philadelphia’s Skyline

Today, I coordinated the activities of two groups of faculty and students working on archaeological related projects at the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA USA. One project supervised by Erik Sundquist, Director of the Westphal Hybrid Lab and being produced by Riley Stewart, a Digital Media sophomore is an 11 ft. replica of a cheval de frise, an American Revolution era underwater weapon used to prevent British warships from sailing into Philadelphia. The artifact was recovered in the Delaware River in 2007 by maritime archaeologist J. Lee Cox Jr. and donated to the Independence Seaport Museum. Shortly after the artifact was recovered,  Craig Bruns, Chief Curator, Independence Seaport Museum, asked if my team of faculty and students could make a 3D scan of the cheval as part of the Museum’s effort to preserve it. Then Digital Media faculty member Chris Redmann and Digital Media sophomore Mark Petrovich scanned the artifact and produced a 3D model. Recently, Craig asked if we could produce a replica of the cheval from our scan data. Craig plans to use the replica as a proxy for the actual artifact as the Museum prepares to exhibit the cheval de frise. Before producing the full scale replica, Erik and Riley printed a miniature replica of the cheval to test the integrity of the scan data. Satisfied with the model Erik and Riley plan to produce the replica next week.

For the second project I reviewed storyboards for two Public Service Announcements (PSAs) that will be used in October to alert the public to two archaeology events. The first entitled, “Explore Philadelphia’s Buried Past” is a one day celebration where archeologists explain to the public ongoing archaeological work being conducted in Philadelphia. The free event is held at the National Constitution Center and is sponsored by the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum and Independence National Historical Park (INHP) Archaeology lab. The other PSA will announce that October is Pennsylvania Archaeology Month. The storyboards are being produced by Digital Media freshman, Ryan Rasing. Both PSA’s will feature 3D models of archaeological artifacts from the INHP’s archaeology collection. The artifacts were scanned last week at INHP’s Archaeology Lab by Digital Media graduate student Jonnathan Mercado assisted by Ryan. Both are working to produce the PSAs that will appear on the upper floors of the Pennsylvania Energy Company (PECO) Building high above the city of Philadelphia for all to see.

Ryan (left) Jed Levin, Chief Historian INHP (center) Jonnathan (right) examine 3D scan data at INHP’s Archaeology Lab

Ryan (left) Jed Levin, Chief Historian INHP (center) Jonnathan (right) examine 3D scan data at INHP’s Archaeology Lab


Day of Archaeology – What have Archaeovision been doing? A Computational perspective

From James Miles:

As a relatively new commercial company we have had a lot of success within a number of research projects utilising computational methods in archaeology. We began the year by recoding the Insula Dell’ara Coeli in Rome, a second century building that can be found at the foot of the Capitoline hill. This was followed by a number of imaging related projects such as our Rode Imaging project, our photogrammetry work for the National museum of Estonia, Deerhurst Church and Salisbury Cathedral, included a 3D print of part of the medieval frieze found in the chapter house. Combined with other laser scanning projects such as the work completed at the Lady of Kazan church in Tallinn and the Ice House at Beaulieu, it has been a very busy year for us.

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3D print of the Medieval Frieze

As those who specialise in computational methods, the majority of our time is spent in front of a computer, staring blankly at a screen waiting for our software to work and to stop crashing. Today has been no different! Archaeovision is split into three organisations, we have a company in England, a company in Estonia and a non-profit organisation that allows us to apply for research grants. We have therefore been working on a number of different projects within one day. James who is based in the UK has spent the majority of the day working on his PhD trying to process laser scan models for use within structural analysis tests and finalise a few of his thesis chapters. At the same time he been working on the admin side of the business, dealing with emails, invoices and trying to arrange our storage system. He has recently returned from California where he was part of a research led project looking at Chumash archaeology run by the University of Central Lancashire. His involvement was based on the recording of a number of different cave systems and he will spend this evening going through the scan data, tidying the data and creating virtual replicas of the areas required.

 

Openness

Californian landscape

Attached to our UK company are Tom Goskar and Paul Cripps. Both act as consultants for us and both have already posted about their ongoing work. Tom’s focused on his medieval and web based work whilst Paul’s mentioned his work on his automation project and LiDAR project. Tom and Paul are both experts in their field and it’s a privilege to be able to work with them. Part of the emails that James has been dealing with today is through a future calibration project that follows Paul’s LiDAR work. We are in the final stages of negotiating terms and hopefully this will be underway shortly. At the same time James and Hembo, who is a partner of the business, have been dealing with a request for a website design, again today was spent trying to finalise the details of the work and understand fully what our client wants. Hembo has an extensive background in web based technology and has spent most of the day working on the website for the 2016’s CAA conference that is taking place in Oslo, Norway. Hembo manages this website, along with many others, throughout the year. Today Hembo has been focussing on the Open Conference System for the CAA conference, trying to streamline the submission process for next year’s papers. Hembo has also recently returned from Italy through his involvement in the Portus Project and has been working on the archive system used on site.

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Connected to out Estonian team, Kaarel has managed to find time away from the computer and has spent the day completing a survey in south west Estonia. Andres has spent the day working on his Haapsalu Episcopal Castle project which captured an incredible 404 scans over a two day period. He has been tidying up the model for use within a Building Information Model and has been establishing if any areas need further recording. His work made the national news this week which has been great for the company. Connected to this, James was also interviewed during the week in regard to the Ein Gedi scrolls because of his experience with Computed Tomography scanning. The article that the interview was used for was published today on the Smithsonian website. Although the majority of the interview was not used, it has been a good day for us in terms of publicity and for the University of Southampton which James is connected to.

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Laser scan model of Haapsalu Castle

For most of us our day has been spent inside. On plus side for those of us in the UK, we have avoided the rain and have a fondness for coffee. A perfect combination for the long days’ worth of processing data and dealing with admin. Tomorrow involves more of the same but we will get to play about with some photogrammetric modelling that needs to be completed for one of our ongoing projects.

A Digital Day of Archaeology

Wooston Castle Local Relief Model draped over a 3D Digital Terrain Model, all based on LiDAR data and available on Sketchfab

Wooston Castle Local Relief Model draped over a 3D Digital Terrain Model, all based on LiDAR data and available on Sketchfab

As is usual for me, my day comprises working on digital heritage projects, as in my previous Days of Archaeology (2011a, 2011b, 2012, 2013 and 2014). So no archaeological features were harmed in the making of this post!

Although on one current project, my GSTAR doctoral research, I am indeed working with archaeological excavation data from the archives of Wessex Archaeology combined with museums collections data from Wiltshire Museum and also heritage inventory data from the Wiltshire Historic Environment Record. This project is nearing completion (thesis due for submission April-ish next year!) and having already shown that geospatial information can be published and used in Semantic Web / Linked Data contexts through the integration of ontologies, I’m currently building demonstrators to show how data can then be used to undertake archaeological research through framing fairly complex archaeological research questions as spatial queries asked across the range of resources I’ve included.

Today however, I’m working mainly on Archaeogeomancy commercial projects as I do one day a week. And thanks to the wonders of digital technologies, I’m working out of Bristol for a change; my first Day of Archaeology away from Salisbury. It’s been a busy week this week, clocking up quite a few miles, as Monday and Tuesday were spent at the Pelagios Linked Pasts event held at Kings College London where a diverse group from across the world spent a very productive couple of days talking about Linked Data with particular emphasis on people, places, space and time.

This morning’s tasks focussed on an automation project involving planning applications. I’m building a system which consumes planning data collated by Glenigan, classifies it according to type of project (as defined by the client) and then pushes out regional and property specific maps and summaries on a weekly/monthly basis for a list of properties which may be affected by these planning applications. This allows specialists in each region to assess each planning application and make recommendations regarding any responses needed. So whilst not the shiniest and most academically interesting of projects, it is the kind of GIS based systems development and automation that can really make a difference by freeing up staff time from the mundane production of such maps and reports.

This afternoon’s tasks will focus on another system I’m developing, this time to assist with the analysis and interpretation of LiDAR data. I’m building a toolkit which incorporates a select range of visualisation techniques requested by the client including Local Relief Maps, Principal Components Analysis and the usual hillshades, slope, etc. The toolkit is to be deployed to users who are not necessarily experts in the analysis and interpretation of LiDAR data or GIS so needs to be simple to use with many variables preset and also needs to be integrated within their corporate GIS solution rather than be a standalone application. The first batch of tools mentioned above are all complete and working nicely; this afternoon’s mission is to wrap up the Openness and Sky View Factor visualisations.

Indeed, it’s been great working with LiDAR data again lately. When thinking of a suitable image for this year’s Day of Archaeology post, the one shown above immediately leapt to mind. It shows a screenshot of the output of the Local Relief Model (LRM) tool I built draped over the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) for a rather lovely hillfort as viewed on Sketchfab. I mention this because disseminating informative views of LiDAR data has long been problematic, but platforms such as Sketchfab allow us to composite 3D and 2D products and then share them in an interactive way with anyone who has a web browser and an internet connection without the need for any specialist software at all. Nice.

Closing Time

pef

by Giuliano De Felice

Digital Archaeology Lab, Foggia University (Italy)

giulianodefelice@gmail.com

Archaeology is nothing without a narration: aghat’s why I spend the most of my teaching and research activities trying to figure out how to connect archaeology and communication.

Day 1, in the classroom

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One day, in the classroom …

Me: “… And if today it is impossible to imagine archaeological communication –and any archaeological activity- without the support of digital technologies, the question always bouncing in my mind is: what are the terms of this growing interaction and what can we expect for archaeological communication in the future?”

Class: “Better instruments, growing precision, more integration!”

Me: “Sure, but a real evolution is not to be confused with technological development, which, as we can easily imagine, will keep on growing enormously, but rather has to be pursued experimenting new and richer integration forms which aim to make the archaeology of the future a shared, public and sustainable one”.

Class: “Ok. And then?”

Me: “The starting point is that, as a side effect of the ‘digital’ approach to archaeological communication, archaeological heritage has swiftly become a collection of finds and monuments from which to choose, case by case, the one that will most enhance the technical capabilities of computers and software”.

Class: “Yes, we see that 3D visualisation is today the principal medium of archaeological communication: the demand for multimedia products in museums and parks or other cultural institutions remains high, while the pursuit of ever more beautiful and attractive products is in full swing. Today much of the communication game of archaeology involves the creation of breath–taking reconstructions and models”.

Me: “Yes. Today everyone can produce on a laptop a kind of content that 5 years ago was reserved to mainstream productions! But the rapid and uninterrupted development of computer graphic techniques seems to be taking archaeological communication toward a strange kind of a modern (and virtual) neoclassicism: the rest of the world still considers it as an adventurous occupation, delving into ancient secrets, strange objects and mysterious monuments.

Class: “Or else a dry and dusty routine of observation and cataloguing …”

Me: “Right! 3D surveys of entire monumental complexes or ancient art objects, immersive models of famous archaeological sites, as well as high quality virtual reconstructions have drawn the attention away from that bunch of stuff you learn during your classes”.

Class: “…”.

Me: “I mean that every archaeologist perfectly knows that archaeology is not only concerned with individual finds or monuments; it deals every day with mute, dull and irrelevant fragments (of a whole that no longer exists) and seeks to squeeze them to reconstruct activities, stories, visions, cultures, of which those fragments are often the only traces. So, if the significance of an archaeological object is more complex than its material aspect and is profoundly linked to the story it conceals and yet could reveal, let’s try to narrate this story!”

Day 2-118. In lab, at home, in the train.

In the next days, I was browsing some books when I casually saw a picture of a museum display. A simple museum display containing a bunch of twenty little loom weights. And it was love at first sight. I had to tell their story!

So I started to develop a little personal project during my spare time: realizing a short computer animation movie, inspired by archaeology but linked with all day life, something that everybody could understand and, I hoped, love. That’s the story of Closing Time; someone could describe it as an attempt to find new connections between technical solutions and the expressive potentials of archaeology, investigating new languages and expressive forms … For me it’s the attempt to raise a smile from archaeology.

The creation process has been a wonderful nightmare. I had to study a lot, learning to carry out a lot of activities, and to make a long and amazing journey through from the sweet lands of preproduction, through the stormy waters of production, to the not-so-still harbour of postproduction.

I started thinking about a subject, writing down a screenplay and than drawing and painting a storyboard …

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Storyboarding 1

… and animating a storyreel:

first storyreel

The storyreel

Characters begin to take shape

One of the first thing I decided to do was choosing music. This has been the most difficult and more exciting part: music helped finding the mood of the movie, imagining the duration of the scenes and setting up what I can call the rhythm of narration. Before adding music my project was totally static and boring; music is animation.

Then I drawn, modelled, skinned and animated the characters …

Modeling and skinning

Modeling and skinning

After that I built a set …

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The set

…and animated every character, scene by scene. Doing, redoing, deleting, starting over, many, many times.

Animating

Animating

And then rendered. 3 weeks on 3 PCs to get the job done (5400 HD720p frames needed) …

Rendering

Rendering

And, at the end … postproduction. That means for instance retouching the render output to achieve a good result, but also trimming scenes with precision, adding transitions and other video editing tricks, adding sounds, foley, titles. And of course easter eggs! You cannot release a CG movie without hiding easter eggs!

Postproduction!

Postproduction!

Day 119, in the classroom, again.

Me: “Dear guys, please let me introduce to you the project that has been my main activity for the last 4 months. It’s my first short animation movie. 3 minutes of …”

Class: “Wait wait wait … 4 months for 3 minutes?”

Me: “Yes; but every single second is the hard outcome of struggle among creative issues, technical problems, temporary lacks of inspiration and all the things I taught during my course!”.

Class: “He’s gone mad …”

Day 120. Today.

I believe that besides any kind of innovation what is really needed to renew archaeology is the creation of writing styles and narratives that can animate the bulk of knowledge scattered throughout the knowledge domain. Apart from requiring formal perfection in visualisation, we could require digital technologies to support a narrative plot, to tell a story, to help transmit cultural messages in different ways and forms.

I started this idea of creative reuse of archaeology last year with the 4 videos called Pazzi da museo. Those videos were deliberately ironic as the result of the choice to convey a message containing what little knowledge we have, using a simple and ironic style (last year my post for DoA 2014 was dedicated to the realization of these videos, together with Matteo Toriello, a very capable digital animator). This year, Closing Time is a further step: not only because I did everything on my own, but also because there is no connection at all with archaeological knowledge; the characters could have been everything else than loom weights. The important point is that they are used as characters: they want to introduce themselves, come to life and narrate their story.

A simple story, because, in spite to common belief, only in few occasions archaeological finds are masterpieces or wonderful objects: in most cases they are common people, exactly like the rest of us.

Ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of NewHouse Productions and Pazzi da Museo, please welcome Closing Time!

All the other videos quoted in the paper are on Giuliano De Felice’s YouTube channel.

Reconstructing a dolmen

Today is a busy one for me. I’m writing this on an overcrowded train to London on the first stage of a journey to the USA. It’s for pleasure not work, although as many archaeologists will tell you, at times the division is a blurry one.

For the past few months I’ve been working on a number of interesting projects. I have been working with Sustrust on the Giants Quoit project. For the last four years they have been working tirelessly with the Cornwall Council Historic Environment Service to excavate the site of Carwynnen Quoit near Camborne in Cornwall.

The dolmen (an entrance grave with three orthostats, or uprights, topped with a large flat capstone) fell down In 1842, and being a popular local landmark it was re-erected shortly afterwards. Unfortunately, in 1966, after an alleged earth tremor, it fell down once again. This time, the stones remained in a pile, and memories of the Quoit faded. In 2009 Sustrust bought the five acre field where the remains of the dolmen lay, and began to hatch plans to re-erect it.

My involvement came earlier this year, 2014, when I was asked to virtually reconstruct Carwynnen Quoit from existing laser scans of the individual stones and to investigate a number of other stones that had the potential to contain rock art. Armed with large quantities of 3D and excavation data and a number of historic photos from different angles, I busied myself with moving the modelled stones around on screen. One of the decisions made early on by the whole team was to reconstruct the quoit as it could have appeared thousands of years ago. Our historic images of the monument show the orthostats leaning at dangerous angles, having spent millennia being persuaded by gravity to cease trying to defy it, gradually tilting before collapsing.

Setting the stones upright by archaeologically studying the sockets in the ground and wear on the capstone meant that the Giants Quoit (as it is locally known) could stand again for, hopefully, millennia. It will never be exactly the same as the quoit was when originally built some 4500 years ago, but close, and importantly, safe, so that people can enjoy and engage with the monument.

I visited Carwynnen Quoit on a rainy day back at the beginning of May and it was a hive of activity. A school visit was in progress with a large marquee was set up as an outdoor classroom, with demonstrations of ancient technology such as honeysuckle rope construction, pottery, and theories about how the stones were originally moved. Lessons in poetry and art were planned for later in the day. I’m sure that day will have an influence on them for years to come – considering that local schools were also involved in the excavations of previous years, I wouldn’t be surprised if the seeds of a few embryonic archaeological careers haven’t been sown.

Using photogrammetry I made very detailed 3D models of the stones thought to contain rock art, and got a good feel for the site and how it may have appeared during the late Neolithic. We also crowded around the computer to continue to twist and move stones to help inform the reconstruction. It was decided to make a triangular wooden template to make sure that the orthostats would be positioned correctly.

Back at the office I processed the images of the rock art stones – the “Shield Stone” and “Coffin Stone” – into 3D point clouds and began to use a number of techniques to enhance details cut into the surface of the stones. I came to the conclusion that the marks on the Coffin Stone were mainly natural, although human-influenced, perhaps as a result of ploughing, dragging or even an attempt to dress it at some point. It is tempting to see a series of intersecting lines which form uneven diamond or lozenge patterns as deliberate, but they’re easily formed unintentionally.

The Shield Stone is interesting. The markings are deliberate, but I remain to be convinced that they were part of a singular design.

Photogrammetry of the reconstructed orthostats

Photogrammetry of the reconstructed orthostats

The 3D point clouds allow all kinds of analysis to take place that you cannot do physically, such as colouring the stone by depth to enhance details cut into the stone (they show up as a different colour to flatter parts) and removing distracting details such as the natural colours of the stone.

To match one of the historic photos of Carwynnen Quoit, an Edwardian picnic is being organised where participants will dress in period costume, eat lunch, and pose for a real plate photograph. Sadly, I’ve just had to reply to the invitation explaining that I’ll still be in the USA when it happens – I’d never normally turn away the opportunity for a ‘proper’ antiquarian day out!

Below are a few of the images that I created for the project. Visit the Giants Quoit website to find out more, and be sure to come back to the Day of Archaeology site to explore more of the amazing posts submitted today.

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Simulated glass plate image of the 3D reconstruction

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Laser scanned orthostats placed upon the excavation plan


Enhancing worn inscriptions and the Day of Archaeology 2012

My name is Tom Goskar and I am one of the organisers of the Day of Archaeology, as well as being a freelance archaeologist who specialises in applying digital techniques to different aspects of the discipline. My day today has been rather mixed, but predictably involved being at the proverbial digital coalface of archaeology in two aspects.

At 8am I checked my email to catch up with the behind-the-scenes talk between the eight organisers of the Day of Archaeology, and log into this website to begin moderating the posts that were by then flowing thick and fast. By 11am I had been on a Google Hangout with Pat and Jess, and we had re-jigged the homepage to make it easier to explore, as well as temporarily excluding posts from last year to highlight the new contributions. It looked much better afterwards. I have been dipping into the website on and off all day, making sure that posts looked good, and expanding and linking the occasional acronym to help readers know what they are. The DoA moderators have been hard at work in the engine room!

In between, for a personal project I have been processing 3D data from a medieval cross close to where I live, here in Penzance, Cornwall, as well as helping to refurbish a soon-to-be-open digital arts space in the town centre.

The Penzance Market Cross, made in the 11th century, is decorated and has many inscriptions. These are very eroded and most people do not notice them. Unless you happen to see the stone in just the right glancing sunlight, the sides of the cross appear to just have some panels of dots and a few lines, not much else. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Using photogrammetric techniques, I have been examining the cross to see if how well 3D capture techniques can enhance the inscriptions and decorations, with the aim of comparing my results with drawings made using traditional techniques (rubbings, chalking, torchlit photos).

In the spirit of the Day of Archaeology, below is a working illustration showing the north east elevation of the Market Cross, which I produced for this blog post. In the centre of the image is the cross as the casual visitor may see it. To the left, the colour information has been removed (which can sometimes be distracting), leaving the shape of the stone artificially coloured grey, with a virtual light source moved to show some of the decoration. To the right, a Radiance Scaling shader has been applied, which colours concavities and convexities to help reveal details on the stone.

Penzance Market Cross

Penzance Market Cross, captured in 3D with photogrammetry, and enhanced using digital filters.

 

As you can see from the Radiance Scaling image to the right, there is definitely more going on than first meets the eye. The figure in the second panel from the top is clearly visible, as are the letters and glyphs in the lower two panels. As I type, I am processing a mesh with a much higher level of detail, and look forward to the results which will be ready in the early hours of tomorrow morning. Comparing the results to the accepted interpretations made by Professor Charles Thomas will be interesting, whether they differ or help to confirm what we already know.

So, my Day of Archaeology has been a busy and varying one, and it’s not over yet. Time to publish this post, and return to the list of posts to publish some more from around the globe, so that we can all show to the world what archaeologists really get up to in our own words. I hope that it helps people today and in the future to understand just how exciting and relevant archaeology is to us all.

You can follow my archaeology musings over at my blog Past Thinking.

Don Walker: Archaeological Help for Doctors

Caution: osteologists at work

The Digitised Diseases project, a collaboration between the University of Bradford, Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) and the Royal College of Surgeons, is producing high resolution laser 3D scans of diseased human bones. These will be included in a medical resource website aimed at informing and teaching doctors and other professionals. The advantage of working with bone from archaeological sites and museum collections is that they can illustrate rare lesion types, some of which may not appear frequently in 21st century clinical medicine. Without access to antibiotics, sufferers of chronic diseases in the past could go on to develop the full extent of bony lesions. Having won JISC funding for the project, the team is currently selecting appropriate examples of pathological change for scanning. Following the excavation of a large number of burial grounds from different periods ofLondon’s history, MOLA is uniquely placed to provide interesting examples of disease for scanning. Each bone is entered into the database which produces an index number. They are then described, photographed and scanned. The photographs are then mapped onto the scans by gaming industry experts to produce the final textured 3D image. The illustrations below show scanned ‘blanks’ prior to photographic mapping.

Laser scanned image of a mature adult male with possible nasopharyngeal carcinoma from post-medieval Southwark, London

Laser scanned image of a right arm bone (humerus) with dwarfism from Medieval East London

 

For further information please see:-

@digidiseases

@_donwalker

http://www.facebook.com/MOLArchaeology