Aswan

Rescue Archaeology in Egypt and Digital Image Analysis

I kicked the day off here in TOPOI Haus, Freie Universität Berlin, with further preparations for a planned joint rescue archaeology mission in Aswan, Egypt, early next year. Egypt has been facing very challenging times and while thdeske looting of Egypt’s cultural heritage is horrific, it pales in comparison to the economic hardship and other woes people are enduring in their-to-day lives up and down the Nile Valley. So while in the short term, planning future fieldwork is filled with uncertainty, I am pressing forward in the hopes that things will improve. My heart goes out to my Egyptian colleagues and friends today especially, with more rival rallies being held and resolution seeming rather far off.

This afternoon I shifted gears and continued with analysis of Reflectance Transformation Imaging data. I am finishing up some loose ends from my Marie Curie COFUND fellowship project on inscribed and decorated objects from early Egypt and Southern Mesopotamia. I am re-processing some images to see if I can improve the visualisation of surfaces with self-shadowing problems and preparing digital illustrations of others.

In tandem with this work, I am annotating my processing and digital epigraphy workflows in a training document in preparation for an RTI training workshop I am organising for TOPOI affiliates (similar to the fantastic training Cultural Heritage Imaging ran for us last year). I also had a couple of phone and email exchanges with folks from the Cologne Center for eHumanities (CCeH). They are interested in following up a digital imaging workshop I co-delivered a few weeks ago with a project applying RTI to lead curse tablets in various collections around the world – an exciting prospect!

 

Archaeology Summer Schools

Spent the day running annual summer schools on Ancient Egypt and the Near East for Bloomsbury Summer School at University College London. My passion is public engagement and lifelong learning. We run six different 5-day summer courses every year, open to anyone with an interest in Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East, of all ages (16 up) and backgrounds. Friday was the last day of this year’s summer schools – the final day of ‘Lofty Places and Sacred Space: archaeology in the Ancient Near East’ and a course on Ancient Egyptian literature. At UCL we are privileged to house the extraordinary collection of archaeological material in the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. Our summer courses often include object-based learning in this very special museum, and gallery talks in the grander galleries of the British Museum. Now it’s time to start thinking about which archaeologists/curators/academics to invite to teach next year’s summer schools. We also have our winter course taught in Egypt to look forward to – a week in Aswan with visits to archaeological sites in the mornings and lectures in the afternoons – can’t wait!

 

Well worth a visit ...