Barcelona

Writing about the “cooks”

My name is Sandra and I am an archaeologist currently dedicated to my Phd Thesis. Today, July 26th, I’m writing. My office is in Barcelona, very close to the beach. In hot and humid days such as today, you can even smell the salty see in every corridor of the building. My aim for today is to write a big chunk of the chapter I’m working on these days, which is the spatial analysis of a site called “Artisans’ Quarters” in Mochlos, Crete (Bronze Age). And trying to scape the temptation to jump into the sea!

By “spatial analysis” I mean something pretty simple: in a given settlement, I identify where people performed specific activities and then I see if people did mingle a lot or, on the contrary, their everyday lifes developed in segregated spaces. I am specially interested in the cooks, those people who had to cook everyday to ensure the survival of the group. So I’ve basically spent the last years trying to find kitchens, hearths, cooking pots, querns, faunal remains… to have a glimpse of their lifes. But, for my Phd thesis, I work with published materials, which means that my quest is basically in the libraries and work is done in front of a computer.

This year is being specially hard because I must finish my thesis and cannot dedicate time to the fun part of the work: “the field”. Normally, every summer I participate in different excavation projects in Crete, where the office dissapears and you get “to touch soil”. Now I miss it. I miss my friends, I miss the landscape, I miss the work, and I miss Greece. Hopefully, next summer I will be able to resume my duties there, until then… writing, writing, writing.

My archaeological day

My archaeological day


Writing about the “Cooks”

My name is Sandra and I am an archaeologist currently dedicated to my Phd Thesis. Today, July 26th, I’m writing. My office is in Barcelona, very close to the beach. In hot and humid days such as today, you can even smell the salty see in every corridor of the building. My aim for today is to write a big chunk of the chapter I’m working on these days, which is the spatial analysis of a site called “Artisans’ Quarters” in Mochlos, Crete (Bronze Age!). And trying to scape the temptation to jump into the sea!

By “spatial analysis” I mean something pretty simple: in a given settlement, I identify where people performed specific activities and then I see if people did mingle a lot or, on the contrary, their everyday lifes developed in segregated spaces. I am specially interested in the cooks, those people who had to cook everyday to ensure the survival of the group. So I’ve basically spent the last years trying to find kitchens, hearths, cooking pots, querns, faunal remains… to have a glimpse of their lifes. But, for my Phd thesis, I work with published materials, which means that my quest is basically in the libraries and work is done in front of a computer.

This year is being specially hard because I must finish my thesis and cannot dedicate time to the fun part of the work: “the field”. Normally, every summer I participate in different excavation projects in Crete, where the office dissapears and you get “to touch soil”. Now I miss it. I miss my friends, I miss the landscape, I miss the work, and I miss Greece. Hopefully, next summer I will be able to resume my duties there, until then… writing, writing, writing.


Is this a job?

One of the usual questions we are asked is if being an archaeologist is a normal job. Many people in Catalonia (Spain) think that archaeologists are only students or volunteers working with a lot of enthusiasm. But our passion is a professional way of life and that is the reason why three of us created Arkpadoc, a company specialized in commercial archaeology.

Today, a special day, we want to share with others the state of our projects. We work with new technologies, incorporating photogrametry in archaeological drawing. We also incorporate it in the analysis of structures and ancient buildings. It allows us to know the historical evolution of each one. Today we’re working in a great project where Museum of Catalonian History is involved too. We’re providing support to the documentation team of Escaladei’s study and reconstruction. Escaladei is a Carthusian monastery located in the Montsant mountains (Priorat, Catalonia)

At the same time, we’re cooperating in the catalogation of the typical rural constructions -called “masies”- in a little town, La Garriga, 30 km from Barcelona. Now, we’re in the last episode of a huge work which includes documentation of each building, historical review, GIS applications, etc.

We’re very proud of our job. Revealing our common heritage and promoting it are the reasons to work hard every day, not only this special “Day of Archaeology”.

Thanks a lot!

Arkpadoc SC.

http://arkpadoc.wordpress.com// @Arkpadoc