I’m no David Hockney…

Montage of my desk

My desk at Internet Archaeology


This is the view from my desk most days here at Internet Archaeology. As a 4 day week kind of gal, I only work mornings on a Friday so my day today is full of small jobs that I know I can complete and feel some sense of achievement about. Today, I have been:

  1. Creating this post (and think I just managed to avoid my home email address from being blacklisted after sending all these montage photos to work from my iPad! Duh. In my defence, I’d not had my 3rd cup of coffee)
  2. Posted out a call for applications for 2 new PhD positions at York and Aarhus in Digital Heritage
  3. Sent out requests to recent authors to fill in my author survey to make sure they think I’m doing ok. Looking at the responses so far, authors seem to be generally very happy!
  4. Added final edits and bibliographic tweaks to the last article about to be published in issue 36
  5. Accepted a new article proposal in principle from a researcher in Norway
  6. Having crossed these jobs off, I’ve added at least the same number again to my to do list

Now, I can sit back and enjoy my coffee 🙂



Coffee and Geometry

My name is Gareth Beale, I am a Phd student and I am working in the office at the University of Southampton.

Things have started well today, the temperamental coffee machine worked like a charm after the usual spluttering and steaming.  

It is a rather gloomy summers day here in Southampton and I would dearly love to be digging at some far flung corner of the (southern) Roman Empire where temperamental coffee machines are nothing but a dim memory and there is a cafe on every corner stuffed full of espresso and pastries, but alas it is not to be. Instead we are talking 3D computer graphics. This will not come as a surprise to anybody who has spent any time at Southampton, but it may well come as a disappointment to anybody reading this post. 

I am currently engaged in the process of writing a chapter for my PhD on the subject of Physically Accurate computer graphics and thier potenital as archaeological research tools. This morning will be dedicated to the dicussion of the relative merits of different forms of 3D data acquisition, specifically, time of flight laser scanning, triangulation laser scanning and structured light scanning. 

More coffee anyone?