Medieval Chapels and Monastic Sites in Glamorgan and Gwent

Hello, my name is Richard Roberts, Project Manager with GGAT based in Swansea.  Assisted by my colleague Rachel Bowden, I am undertaking  a project on behalf of Cadw investigating medieval ecclesiastical sites in southeast Wales.

We have so far created dossiers on the historical and archaeological background for the selected chapel and monastic sites, and have undertaken a desk-top analysis to identify those sites which are likely to retain significant remains.   The use of aerial photographs is a key element of the project, and is already proving especially useful to identify the extent of monastic precincts.

At the moment we are preparing  the ground for the fieldwork, identifying and contacting landowners.  The fieldwork, a rapid descriptive and photographic walkover-survey, has been tailored to aid the assessment of the heritage resource with reference to aspects such as survival, condition and significance.  It is hoped that recommendations made will enhance conservation and the long-term preservation of the best of the resource.

My fifth cup of tea and the archaeology is fine

GGAT logo and QRtag intergratedAfternoon world, I’ve sorted out everybody else now it’s my turn to blog about archaeology.

My name is Paul and I’m the Outreach Officer/Web Manager for the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust.

When I’m not meeting people and promoting the archaeology of the Southeast Wales area or sitting in my cupboard under the stairs drinking tea, which archaeologists tend to consume aplenty, building sites, blogging and tweeting and other Web2.0 shenanigans,  I’m carrying out work for the Twentieth Century Military Standing Sites Project.  The group was set up in 2003 to identify the most important sites in Wales and to work to preserve and promote their significance to a wider audience. The group is made up of the four Welsh Trust, for which I am our area representative, Cadw, RCAHMW, and other interested parties.

I’m just off to carry out a basic photographic survey of a building that is due for demolition and once belonged to RAF ST Brides Major in the Vale of Glamorgan. I’ll keep you posted on how it goes.

Post-excavation – if you love alphabetising your DVD and CD collections this is the job for you.

We are the Cosmeston post-excavation team based in and from Cardiff University. Our job involves working with the paper and material archive, preparing it for analysis and interpretation. This year’s excavation at Cosmeston ended last week after a month of hard digging (see our blog) and this week the post-excavation team has been digitising the paper archives, scanning in slides from the 1980s excavations, as well as sorting and marking pottery. After four years of excavation there is a good amount of work to do and already the context information, registers and half of the pottery excavated in 2009 have been digitised, archived and organised. Today we will introduce you to a number of our students and provide an account of a day in the life of a post-excavation team.

Cosmeston is a medieval settlement in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales. Initially discovered in 1979 by local archaeology company GGAT, University excavations since 2007, involving students and the local community, have advanced our understanding of this complex medieval settlement. The site was reconstructed in the 1980s on the foundations of a number of the excavated buildings and is now a living museum with pigs, ducks and sheep, cared for by the staff who also manage and maintain the buildings and land. This is a well loved local resource which also acts as a set for the filming of Merlin.

Day in the life of an archaeological planning officer

I am Neil Maylan and I work as the Archeological Planning Manager for the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust, based in Swansea, Wales. We provide advice to 13 local planning authorities in South East Wales and I hope to be able to provide a work diary for today.

I started my working day circa 7.30am. As part of my job I am responsible for the Trust’s IT network and e-mails, so my first job is to check the e-mails that have come in overnight, delete the vast number of spam messages that are sent to our open e-mail accounts and redirect any messages that have been wrongly addressed or sent to the open accounts and need to be answered by a specific member of staff.

I also check my own e-mails received over night, fortunately few today and read the weekly newsletter from the Institute for Archaeologists (IfA) Maritime Affairs Group, which always has some fascinating information on an area of archaeology I really don’t know enough about.