AROURA Project – archaeological reconnaissance in Greece

Molly Greenhouse, Teaching Assistant, ARCH 397, UMBC

The AROURA project (Archaeological Reconnaissance of Uninvestigated Remains of Agriculture) is an archaeological survey of the plain around the 13th century BCE fortress of Glas, Boiotia, in central mainland Greece. It aims to detail the Mycenaean hydraulic, drainage, and land-improvement works around the fortress, and to search for traces of the expected extensive agricultural system they served. AROURA is an official collaboration between the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), and the 9th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities (IX EPCA) of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports, based in Thebes, Dr. Michael Lane (UMBC) and Dr. Alexandra Charami (IX EPCA) co-directors.

The survey and surface collection phases of the project began in October of 2010, and have since been completed. The entire project area was divided into grid squares at the outset to allow investigators to conduct geophysical survey easily and systematically across large portions of the plain, using techniques like magnetometry to detect underground “anomalies” that might be traces of previous land use. In certain grid squares, both in the plain and at the nearby settlement site of Aghia Marina Pyrghos, finds were collected from the surface of the ground too. Our goal this season is to organize, catalog, and analyze the many finds, mainly pottery, collected during previous years.


All of the finds are stored at the Archaeological Museum of Thebes, so during the week, we travel there from our home in the village of Kokkino to work on the collection. Currently, we are working on the pottery from surface collection at Aghia Marina Pyrghos. After labeling each piece and ensuring that it is properly catalogued, we start to focus on more in-depth analysis of the pottery. In the lab, we carefully examine the artifacts and record basic information about the size and shape of the pieces, as well as other more detailed information. We have been closely examining the pottery for mineral inclusions in its fabric (the constituents of the clay from which it is made). Examining hundreds of individual pieces of pottery with a magnifying glass to spot inclusions can be tedious work. However, by collecting this kind of information, we hope to be able to draw conclusions about the periods represented by the pottery and other artifacts at the settlement and where the pottery originated, as well as to hypothesize about how it made its way to the settlement.




Working at the museum in Thebes has been wonderful so far, and it definitely has had its perks. For example, this week, after Prof. Vassileios L. Aravantinos, the former Superintendent of the IX EPCA, dropped in for a surprise visit, we were invited to tour some of the ongoing excavations of the Mycenaean palace beneath downtown Thebes. We are excited to see what results the rest of this season will produce and how the project will expand and develop in future seasons!


The copper hoard from the XIII century was discovered as a whole X.9.5.1, in a pit from Block: XXI, in the course of archeological excavations at the Skopje Fortress in 2009. It contained 50 copper coins, including 5 items of Bulgarian imitations (no. 1-5) and items presenting rulers, namely 2 items presenting Ivan Asen II (no. 6-7), 2 items presenting Theodore Comnenus-Ducas (no. 8-9), 2 items presenting  John Comnenus-Ducas (no. 10-11), 9 items presenting John III Ducas-Vatatzes with (no. 12-20), 4 items presenting Theodor II Ducas-Lascaris (no. 21-24), as well as the most numerous, 24 Latin imitations (no. 25-47). (more…)

Writing about the “cooks”

My name is Sandra and I am an archaeologist currently dedicated to my Phd Thesis. Today, July 26th, I’m writing. My office is in Barcelona, very close to the beach. In hot and humid days such as today, you can even smell the salty see in every corridor of the building. My aim for today is to write a big chunk of the chapter I’m working on these days, which is the spatial analysis of a site called “Artisans’ Quarters” in Mochlos, Crete (Bronze Age). And trying to scape the temptation to jump into the sea!

By “spatial analysis” I mean something pretty simple: in a given settlement, I identify where people performed specific activities and then I see if people did mingle a lot or, on the contrary, their everyday lifes developed in segregated spaces. I am specially interested in the cooks, those people who had to cook everyday to ensure the survival of the group. So I’ve basically spent the last years trying to find kitchens, hearths, cooking pots, querns, faunal remains… to have a glimpse of their lifes. But, for my Phd thesis, I work with published materials, which means that my quest is basically in the libraries and work is done in front of a computer.

This year is being specially hard because I must finish my thesis and cannot dedicate time to the fun part of the work: “the field”. Normally, every summer I participate in different excavation projects in Crete, where the office dissapears and you get “to touch soil”. Now I miss it. I miss my friends, I miss the landscape, I miss the work, and I miss Greece. Hopefully, next summer I will be able to resume my duties there, until then… writing, writing, writing.

My archaeological day

My archaeological day

Digital loom weights at Priniatikos Pyrgos

Priniatikos Pyrgos

Priniatikos Pyrgos from the hills

Today is the last day of the season at Priniatikos Pyrgos, an archaeological project, which has been running in East Crete since 2005. Currently, it is operated under the auspices of the Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies at Athens but it began as an American/Greek project. Excavation at the Bronze Age to modern coastal promontory site ceased in 2010 and since 2011 the project members have returned to study the vast quantities of material and site recordings that were gathered during the 6 years of excavation.


A Lego Colosseum and Other Stories

I am a Classical Archaeologist at the University of Sydney in Australia, and work as the Manager of Education and Public Programs at the Nicholson Museum, Australia’s largest collection of Old World archaeological material.  So my ‘Day of Archaeology 2012’ is spent like most others – trying to balance between museum education and archaeological research on the project I am working: excavations of a Hellenistic-Roman period theatre site in Paphos in Cyprus.


A day off – Faunal Team Catalhoyuk 2012

Friday is our day of rest, so we are at the pool! This week the excavations at the famous Neolithic settlement opened for the season. We are a joint team from Cardiff University UK, Stony Brook, US and Poznan, Poland looking at the faunal remains to understand the human:animal relationship at the site. This week we began the season by examining the bones from building 80 (late in the site but still about 7-8000 years ago). So far we have recorded domestic sheep and dogs, wild aurochs, boar, deer and horses as well as tortoise, stork and jackal. We have a worked aurochs scapula, maybe used as a shovel, a possible bone ‘flute’ and bone gouges.

Excavation is focusing on removing backfill from the previous years ready to start excavation in ernest next week. The focus this year is on a number of houses, some of which have already produced cattle horncore installations, wall paintings and human burials beneath the floors.

Hand prints from Building 77. Two of a long series of handprints. Photo by Ashley Lingle, Catalhoyuk Research Project


The team is building with 60ish of us so far, and increasing to about 150 by the end of next week.  There are labs for human and animal bones, pots, stones, plants, conservation and finds as well as two separate excavation areas.  It is hard to keep track of everyone, so we have posted our photos and names on our lab door so folk can ID us. The excavation is truly international with folk from Sweden, Poland, US, Canada, Turkey, Greece and of course Wales.

Our first day off is being spent at the lovely Dedeman Hotel by the pool using their internet (thanks!). There is extremely restricted internet access at the site.  A highlight this week was the Tarkan concert – a Turkish singing sensation who performed to about 20k people in a mall carpark.

We are looking forward to the rest of the seasons excavations – and working with all the different specialists on-site.   Rather than material being analysed months, or years after it is dug up, in different labs around the world we are all here together.    Roll on the excavations – well, after just one more dip in the pool…..


The Archaeology of Food!

I’ve been a commercial archaeologist for 13 years and have worked in Ireland, Greece and Australia. My days once consisted of jumping into a muddy hole in the depths of winter to shovel out the sticky and waterlogged fills within and then trudge to the spoil-heap with heavy boots. My days also consisted of excavating beautiful wooden troughs in fulachta fiadh (burnt mounds) or excavating postholes of Bronze Age structures in the balmy summer sun. However, the recession in Ireland has led to a decline in commercial archaeological work and the absence of muddy viz-vest clad hordes of trowel-grasping excavators is the most visible proof of this!


Museums and Archaeology

Hello, my name is Candace and I am an Archaeologist.

The University of Sydney, Main quadrangle

This is wheremy career in archaeology began, at the University of Sydney as an undergraduate in the archaeology Department. And is now where I work for Sydney University Museums.


My role at the Sydney University Museums varies from day to day. I work part time as a Collections Officer with the Collection Management team, as well as part time as a Curatorial Assistant for the Nicholson Museum.  These positions afford me the ability to work with the public and behind the scenes of three very different Musuems and Art Galleries! Today I will be working across all three galleries and in the stores photographing my day as I go. In addition to my daily tasks I will also hopefully find some down time to work on a conference paper I’m presenting in two short weeks on my own archaeological research in Northern Greece and the central Balkans. Follow the captions in the Photo Gallery to see where I am and what I am up to!