historical site

Another year and still no dinsoaurs, gold, etc…

Archaeological Services Inc. (ASI) is a Canadian-owned company that was founded in 1980 in response to increasing public awareness of the importance of Ontario’s heritage. With offices in Toronto and Burlington, we are the largest archaeological consulting firm in Ontario. Archaeological Services Inc. provides a variety of services including both archaeological and built heritage resource/cultural landscape pre-development assessments, large-scale heritage planning studies for municipalities, as well as Stage 4 salvage excavation of archaeological sites.

Below you’ll find a photo essay showing what we are up to on this Day of Archaeology 2014. Enjoy, and from all of us at ASI, happy digging!

IMG_2244

It’s a beautiful FRIDAY, JULY 11, 2014 at Archaeological Services Inc. in Toronto and Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

IMG_2181

One of the ASI Partners, Robert Pihl, examining some incredible pipes from the famous Charles Garrad collection (from sites near Collingwood, Ontario).

20140709_100344

Great work on that unit, Sarah! It’s a beauty!

Indy

It’s hard for Dr. Katie Hull (Manager of Historical Archaeology) to keep her adorable Irish Wolfhound puppy – appropriately named “Indy” –  out of the artifact box.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here is a photo taken by one of the crane operators of part of the New Fort site at Exhibition Place, which an ASI crew is currently working on. The foundations are of the northern half of the East Enlisted Men’s Barracks – a mid-nineteenth-century barracks built by the British to compliment the garrison at Old Fort York Garrison Common. What you are seeing in this photo will eventually be covered in a glass floor leading up to the front entrance of a brand new hotel: guests of the hotel will be able to see the original foundations of the barracks!

The crane was about 80-100 feet high when the photo was taken, and the foundations shown are approximately 110 feet (30 metres) by 40 feet (12 metres). For a scale you can see the ASI crew in the lower right corner!

The foundations of the northern half of the building (far right of the photo) are quite intact: the brick walled room (left of centre) is a coal cellar and the brick structures just above and below the foundations are what is left of two brick-lined box drains. There is also a remnant brick pipe drain (immediate right of the stone foundations), however, it is currently underneath a nice thick layer of mud.

If you want to read more information on the New Fort site, which has been actively excavated by ASI for the last 6 years, visit the Featured Project section of our website: http://ow.ly/z0szT

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Wes’ downtown Toronto crew hard at work excavating the New Fort site!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Nobody puts Wes’ crew in a corner… unless of course they are profiling the barracks’ walls.

IMG_1151

Manager of Stage 1 and 2 Planning Division Projects, Bev Garner, on the phone with one of her many clients…

IMG_1152

Senior Archaeologist and Manager of Western Environmental Assessment Projects, Dr. Andrew Riddle, answering emails on his phone. He is also the Manager of IT, so we suppose it’s quite fitting for him to be surrounded by two computers and a smartphone.

IMG_1153

Here is our British star, Greg Pugh, working on a report when he is not out in the field on one of the richest properties we have ever worked on.

IMG_2189

ASI’s Built Heritage and Cultural Heritage Landscape Planning Division (phew!) work so well as a team that they find it hard to do anything without one another. They all wear glasses and read historical architecture books. It’s their thing.

IMG_2194

The perfect juxtaposition of old & new on analyst Miranda’s desk. What a tea-riffic combination!

IMG_2207

We are pleased to announce we have hired a new faunal analyst! Jackson also takes a lot of pride when selecting his office wear.

IMG_2211

The lab was busy today sorting through a new historical site — looks like they’ve “nailed” it.

Wendat

Here are Huron-Wendat representatives Melanie Vincent and Louis Lesage examining their material culture heritage at our offices in Toronto today.

IMG_2191

Senior Archaeologist, Dr. Bruce Welsh, can’t get enough of history. He spends his lunch hour buried in a book.

DSC_0341 copy

ASI often has the privilege of working on a single site for multiple decades, such as the one pictured here. A quick glance through our records of this site produced this gem of a photo of Martin Cooper test-pitting the site in 1989. Years later, following in his footsteps, are Andrea Carnevale and Zeeshan Abedin, directing the salvage excavation of the site along with David Robertson and Robert Pihl. Stefan Jovanovich and Andreas Vatistas, pictured here, rounded off the rest of their team. Artifact analysis and the final report for the recent work are now in the process of being completed.

This is a great, albeit humorous, example of the roles and opportunities women have in the world of archaeology– not only to learn from but to also work alongside their mentors.

Ladies, keep digging!

IMG_2233

Cleo LOVES maps just as much as her owner, Jonas; an ASI Geomatics Specialist.

IMG_2242

Staff archaeologist Jenna hit the 3 pm wall. Thank goodness for her comically large Toblerone. Must. Have. Chocolate. Now!

IMG_2255

Assistant Manager of Urban Archaeology, Thanos Webb, often spends his day on the bike surveying sites downtown. He’s gotten so good at it that he can bike, review maps, make notes and drink coffee all at the same time!

photo 1

It’s a home office day for Staff Archaeologist Caitlin! Great slippers.

photo 2

Our crews have a good time together. It’s pretty obvious.

 photo 3 - Copy

A pretty great panoramic view of Amy and Erika’s historic site excavation.

Sorting

Lithic Specialist Doug Todd’s sorting table. He’s got a primitive process.

Lithics

Middle Archaic points that Doug has recently photographed. A lot of the material he has been looking at as of late comes from sites in Southwestern Ontario.

flake

Check out that detail!

IMG_2235

Chief Archaeologist and Managing Partner, Dr. Ron Williamson, examining an amputation from our excavations of the early nineteenth-century site of the first Toronto General Hospital.

Well, that was a busy day! Thanks for dropping by to see what we’ve been up to!