internship in archaeology

What’s that you say? Interning in an Archaeology Lab? Awesome!

By Kim Jovinelli Internship, Independence National Historical Park Archeology Lab
MA Candidate in Museum Communication University of the Arts, Philadelphia 2013 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Archaeology has always been a large influence on my life. From a young age, I had been exposed to such historical wonders, they almost didn’t seem real. I remember thinking, “How did [insert artifact name] get here?”

and “What makes it so important that it gets to sit behind glass for everyone to see?”

It didn’t hurt either that my father, Anthony, exposed me to movies portraying a Fedora clad, whip brandishing Archaeologist pretty early (though I realize now that Archaeologists don’t traipse the globe hunting down the bad guys and finding the [insert precious lost treasure here]). I was fortunate in that my parents both saw Archaeology was my passion and they nurtured that drive throughout my life. Which lead me to where I am now. Currently, I Intern in the Archaeology Lab at Independence National Historic Park in Philadelphia(Pennsylvania, USA) as part of my curriculum for an Masters of Art Degree in Museum Communication, in the hopes of working with archaeological or historical collections in the future. A typical week includes some usual archaeological lab work (labeling artifacts, mending artifacts, cleaning artifacts, etc), but then there are those days where I get to play with wonderful bits and pieces of the past. Under the supervision and guidance of Deborah Miller, Collections Manager (Independence Park Archeology Lab), I have been in the beginning stages of repacking and cataloging the labs collection of wood items gathered from the site where the National Constitution Center currently stands. To some, this may seem like a daunting task, but I find it fascinating. Yes, there are those random planks or small flakes of wooden items of unknown makeup. But once in a while, there are those items that are so fascinating they require a long look and some deep thought. I like to solve puzzles by nature, so pondering the origin and use of these items is of great interest and keeps my mind working.

Along with the above mentioned project, I am also working to scan and digitize photographic slides taken when the original dig took place from 2000-2003. As someone who would like to work with collections in the future and also someone who sees a more digital future brewing, a skill even as basic as being able to convert slides to digital format and organize them in a cohesive manner is of great use. I am also in the process of pulling and packaging the labs bone (fauna) collection to be sent out for This comprises my typical week. To say it is what I had hoped it would be is an understatement. It is what I can see myself continuing with in the future. My experience at Independence National Historic Park will follow me wherever I may roam, and I like that.

Ceramic and wood artifacts in the Independence National Historical Park Archeology Lab.