NO MAN’S SKY SURVEY

Archaeogaming and Podcasting

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We specifically timed the release  of this new podcast on the Archaeology Podcast Network (APN) so it would coordinate with the Day of Archaeology. The timing to us, couldn’t be more perfect. The APN had worked to create a channel of sorts for all things podcasting about archaeology. At times that’s made it push the envelope for the use of new media in communicating and sharing of archaeology. It’s fitting then, for this network to be the first to dedicate a podcast to the breakout field of Archaeogaming.

This isn’t to say that blogs on the topic have never existed before. A quick glance at the show notes for episode 1 gives an incomplete but informative look at those pioneering the field. The show’s hosts, Andrew ReinhardMeghan Dennis, and Tara Copplestone, consider themselves to be part of the second wave of archaeologists in archaeogaming. They list several researchers before them, but even those only go as far back as the early 2000’s or late 90′. That makes this quite a new branch of archaeology, and like many such branches, there is, at times, strong discussion over if such a thing is even necessary.

Most people are not sure what to do with archaeogaming exactly, it seems new and weird. For the most part it has been received positively, as many can see the need to study the fastest growing part of the entertainment industry. One that is interactive and creating culture around and inside of itself. Reinhard argues that there is no difference between real and virtual culture, that all culture is man-made, therefore even computer generated culture can be studied archaeologically. This idea has been met with some push-back, but overall, his argument stands. You don’t even have to play games to see “gaming culture” in general and genre specific culture in particular.

Archaeogaming examines the culture inside of games as well, and Dennis focuses specifically on the ethics in and around games. Most famously, for example, is it ethical to loot a tomb? What if that is the only option the game gives you to complete a level? What if, in the game world, you are “saving” artifacts by looting them? What if you need to sell those same artifacts for game world money? Dennis is working on these and other questions for her Ph.D. thesis, and explains a bit more about it in her interview on Not Just a Game Episode 2: Looting Mortuary Spaces with Meghan Dennis, the bi-weekly podcast with Dr. Catherine Flick.

Archaeogaming also examines the game code itself as an artifact. Copplestone looks at this intersection of game and archaeology, and it’s a very interesting concept. How does real life archaeology affect game world archaeology? Why do game designers represent archaeology they way that they do? Can we as archaeologists use games as a way of communicating archaeology better to the public? How? What would that game look like?

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At which point all of this brings us to the No Man’s Sky Survey, led by Reinhard. This ambitious real life survey of a huge virtual world is probably not the first of it’s kind, but it is the first to be done on such a detailed and massive scale. Reinhard, Dennis, Copplestone and others have worked hard to create survey and excavation forms, data collection standards, and even a code of ethics for in-game and out of game interaction. Reinhard plans to publish updates on the progress of the survey as well as produce a peer-reviewed paper for presentation and publication. I’m really excited to be part of this and plan to keep track of my own progress over on my own blog (you know, if you want to read it).

In the meantime you can listen to our newest podcast on the APN and learn a lot more about what archaeogaming is and what we hope to accomplish with it.

ARCHAEOGAMING AND THE NO MAN’S SKY SURVEY – EPISODE 1

July 29, 2016

In the first Episode of 8bit Test Pit: Main Campaign we meet our host panel Andrew Reinhard, Meghan Dennis, and Tara Copplestone. We talk about what Archaeogaming is, the history of the field, and what the overall goals of studying the intersection of gaming and archaeology are. We also talk about the upcoming No Man’s Sky Survey and why a survey like this should be done.