Rain

Setting up for the Third Basing House Field Season

Today I’m working at Hampshire Cultural Trust with Dave Allen. I’m lucky because my visit times with the regular weekly volunteer day at the Archaeology Stores, managed by the Curator of Archaeology, David Allen.

To find out more about the work of David and the team, visit their excellent blog, which has a new post every Monday.

Hampshire Archaeology blog: https://hampshirearchaeology.wordpress.com/

Nicole Beale


I’ve driven down to the University of Southampton to help pack the van full of equipment. This is because we’re off to run the Basing House excavation field season on Monday. Very excited! Its chucking in down with rain so we’ve been trying to get all of the kit packed up quickly so that we can dry off.  The dig is run by the University of Southampton, the University of York and Hampshire Cultural Trust.

You can read more about this year’s field season on our blog: http://basinghouseproject.org/

Dom, Chris and the Green Shed

Nicole Beale

Rainy day in southwest wales

Day of Archaeology 2015 begins slowly. Yesterday we spent all day in the sunshine, completing the site plan of a curious series of irregular pits, packed with burnt grain, charcoal and heat-shattered stones. These are evidently medieval, on the grounds that a single medieval pottery sherd was found in the mix! Explaining why the pits are where they are and what exactly was going on may prove more difficult. We have bulk samples for study and charcoal to radiocarbon date. This will take time to unpick.
No outdoor activity today whatsoever. Its raining steadily. So a day in front of computers it will be. We have several assessments to undertake for single, on-farm, wind turbines. We also have a trip to plan for next week, up to Shropshire, to dig some evaluation trenches on anomalies picked up by a geophysical survey on the proposed site of a small solar farm.
2015, like 2014, is largely about renewable energy projects. Now the British government seems determined to roll back the progress made by the renewable sector. This bizarre development may well impact upon the archaeology sector, as many firms undertake work associated with renewable energy projects. This comes on top of the threat to take brownfield sites out of the planning system in England, even here in West Wales we sense that the cold winds of austerity are starting to blow through the world of the archaeologist. So Day of Archaeology 2015 comes at a time when the future for our sector is somewhat clouded by uncertainty. But we plod on…

Novel electrical resistivity tomography @ The University of Bradford

Today, like almost every day between May and September this year I’ve been working on my MSc research Project. Instead of just explaining what I’ve been doing today i thought it would be more interesting to describe what is going into my individual research project.

I’m experimented with a new novel way of collecting electrical resistivity tomography data  with a zzGeo FlashRes64 which as you might expect involves a significant amount of lab and field data collection.

To allow inversion of these novel techniques far too much of my time has been devoted to developing software to allow analysis of the data, and investigation of different visualisation techniques. Though  it does make a nice change from the driving rain outside.

FlashRes to Geotomo program

Before going out in the snow and rain its important to know that the data collected will be as good as possible. This means i spend a lot of time visualising different data collection techniques as point clouds as below. I promise they end up being quite relaxing.

Eventually after determining the best collection strategy, standing out in the rain and the cold for hours, extracting, converting and comparing data you do end up with a decent representation of whats beneath the surface.

 

P.S You should be able to zoom and play with the images above. If you can’t i’d suggest a modern HTML5 compatible browser