William Wyeth (RCAHMS) – Stirling

Stirling ‘Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2011’

Stirling ‘Contains Ordnance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2011’

I’m William Wyeth, one of four Education & Outreach trainees based at RCAHMS in the year-long Skills for the Future programme. My year at the Commission is split between different parts of RCAHMS’ work (Scran, social media, a university module, etc), as well as an external three-month placement. My placement was itself split between Stirling Castle and the Bannockburn Heritage Centre. I’ve chosen the undiscovered site of the second day of the battle of Bannockburn. The battle itself was a pivotal moment in Scottish history, which combines elements of mythology as much as fact. The physical remains of the battle, however, are almost non-existent; thus far, a single 14th-century arrowhead has been found, which may not be linked to the battle in any case. There is no doubt that the battle of 1314 CE took place somewhere around today’s Bannock burn, but frustratingly efforts by archaeologists and metal detectors to locate any evidence in the ground have been unsuccessful.

Since the battle, the area between the Pelstream and Bannock burns (where it is considered the second day of the clash took place) has been used as a ploughed field and dump site for building waste from different periods. Today, the area is largely wild grass, sitting between 20th-century suburban housing and the railway line from Edinburgh to Stirling.

View of the Big Dig. Copyright Aisha Al-Sadie

View of the Big Dig. Copyright Aisha Al-Sadie

I’ve chosen the undiscovered battlefield because it represents the challenge to historians and archaeologists in determining the developments on the ground during this critical day in Scottish history. It has also recently been the focus of a Big Dig in June 2013, which saw fantastic community involvement aimed at establishing the site of the second day’s battle. Part of the activities on the site was filmed for an upcoming TV show produced to celebrate the 700-year anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn.

Filming the Big Dig, with Tony Pollard and Neil Oliver. Copyright Aisha Al-Sadie

Filming the Big Dig, with Tony Pollard and Neil Oliver. Copyright Aisha Al-Sadie



This is what I’ve chosen for Day of Archaeology, but why not tell us your favourite archaeological sites in Scotland on Twitter using #MyArchaeology.


For more information on this site, or others in this area you can also go to the Historic Environment Record for Stirling Council.

Contact Details:

Murray Cook

Municipal Buildings, Corn Exchange, Stirling, FK8 2HU

01786 233663



Searchable HER:


Mississippian Archaeology in the Midwest Heat

Since 2008, archaeologists have been excavating areas of a prehistoric Native American site that covers roughly 478 acres. The site is buried by a meter or more of historic gravel, slag, and trash in East St. Louis, IL and was present from about 900 to 1200 AD. During this time, archaeologists have dug thousands of storage pits and structures (storage, residential, and otherwise). Parts of this site are being mitigated prior to the construction of the new Mississippi River Bridge.

Notable artifacts recovered from this dig include a small flint clay figurine found early on in excavations. The importance of this figurine is two-fold; one for its importance to the pre-historic peoples that manufactured it, and second to demonstrate how historic development has impacted the site itself. The figurine was recovered within a burned structure adjacent to a historic drainage trench. Had the trench been shifted, even a few inches, the figurine could have been destroyed or lost entirely.

Currently, archaeologists are working in close proximity to construction crews. The bridge is scheduled to be opened by 2014, and our last few excavation areas are situated adjacent to the main construction of the bridge and surrounding roadways.

Once excavations are concluded, years of analysis will follow, yielding data that could change the way we interpret the prehistoric history of the region.

Today, I woke up before the sun was up; my turn to drive the work truck. After Memorial Day we implemented our early schedule so instead of starting at 8am we start at 7am.

At the lab I loaded up the necessary paperwork and equipment for the excavation block I worked in and made my way to the site.

Our supervisor (Patrick Durst) had already made the decision to stop field work at lunch today due to the heat. We did the same yesterday.

The block I’m currently in (EB14) is expansive, but most all of the features have been dug. All that’s left are a storage pit and a complex of structures. The pit only required a photograph of the profile to show the depth and the different fill episodes. The structure complex, however, required a bit more attention.

For me, this block is a bit of a breather. The block I was in previously (EB78) had about 50 people in it at its peak. Granted, there were other supervisors also working in that block. But, it was kind of nice to find out I’d only have to deal with two active feature areas and less than 10 people.

The crew in the structure complex continued taking down the basin fill. Within the fill we found an abundance of chert debitage (flakes of stone removed from larger cores or tools). Actually, that’s all we’ve found for the last two days: trays and trays of white (presumably Burlington) chert flakes.

They got to the floor surface of the structure and we began defining the architecture. Based on initial observances of the floor, this appears to be a pair of wall trench structures from the Stirling Phase (1100-1200AD).

By this time, it was getting close to 11am, so we started wrapping up for the day. Our block is dug down a few feet and foliage has started growing up around it. Add to that the backdirt piles created from the excavation, and the little breeze that is blowing on this hot summer day is greatly minimized. So, we were feeling the bright sunshine and humidity and were grateful for an afternoon in the lab.

At the lab I ate my field lunch (half a tomato, half an avocado, two slices of wheat bread, and a peach) and proceeded to the task of preparing for the expansion of the block I was previously working in (EB78).

First I had to go back through the paperwork left in the storage bin from that block to ensure it was all complete and ready to be filed away. Once that was done, I found the maps that would be impacted by the expansion of the eastern edge of the block. Studying the maps I found numerous structures that ran into the eastern wall. I set aside the maps and the notes for these features so that the crew expanding the block will know what to look for. We’ll be able to piece together the partial structures and will be able to assign the existing numbers to these known structures. This way, when the structures are dug we won’t have duplicate numbers and all the data will be in one place.

And that was my day. I wish I could say that something more exciting happened like I saw a wild dog scavenging a deer carcass on the side of the road on the way to the site or that I saw a building ablaze and billowing a thick black column of acrid smoke into the air… But that was Tuesday and Wednesday.

On a personal note, I was given permission by our project direct (Dr. Tom Emerson) to take pictures at the site to document the crewmembers working there. I’ve found that we painstakingly document every feature and every artifact, but when the reports come out the crew are (not intentionally) under represented. As well, I think the general public has a misconception as to what happens at an archaeological site.

What I’m attempting to do is to document people working in a “street photography” fashion. And I’m shooting it on black and white film that I’m developing at home in instant coffee and vitamin C. In the end, I envision some sort of an art-book/coffee table book containing the images in an attempt to mainstream the work we do in a positive fashion. Because yes, the archaeology is important, but equally important are the people that put in the hard work making reports on sites like this possible.

Archaeology down South: between Buenos Aires and Patagonia

Right now it’s winter here in Argentina and we are nearing the end of the first term at the Universidad de Buenos Aires where I teach a year long course in Research Design. Facing me is a pile of my student’s projects to finish correcting by Monday, our last class before the winter break. It is often frustrating but, then again, immensely satisfying when our students finally develop the knack and learn how to put together a solid research proposal. What I most enjoy are the original ideas they bring each year, and being able to keep up with new subjects or research in regions I have little time for otherwise. I enjoy teaching and tutoring.

My time in Buenos Aires is mostly dedicated to carrying out analyses and writing about our research in the archaeology of Originary Peoples in Southern Patagonia. The research year for me “begins” in April after our return from the field and I have to begin to download, classify and label all our digital information (photos, GPS data) as well as digitize our field notes. A lot of this goes into Dropbox so all our team can easily access our database. All this last week I have been going over our field notes trying to inventory and choose more samples to date the archaeological deposits. We also have to plan for time writing up our research as well as preparing for two conference presentations programmed for October. All of a sudden the year seems already too short. (more…)