Video

Filming Archaeologists

I tell people I have the very best job. I get to work with a great group of archaeologists at the Illinois State Archaeological Survey–Prairie Research Institute at the University of Illinois. I have filmed a mummy getting a CT scan, to a lost fort in Warsaw, Illinois, to the most recent story of the bob kitten that was buried like a human. Our archaeologists and staff make my job very easy and let me come to their sites, sit through interviews, and help me tell the story of the archaeological and preservation work they are doing.

 

 

Digging Diaries – Skulls, Shamans and Sacrifice in Stone Age Britain

Hello all archaeology fans from the Digging Diaries Youtube channel!

Here’s a great video covering the amazing Mesolithic dig at Star Carr, North Yorkshire.

Nicky Milner and her digging team from York University are embarking on their final ever excavation on site to unlock the secrets of this mysterious landscape.

Subscribe to our channel and follow us on Twitter (@DiggingDiaries) to keep up to date with all  the new exciting digs and dives happening all over Britain this summer.

Happy Digging from all the team!

I am an archaeologist

We want to celebrate this #dayofarch sharing with all of you the English subtitled version of our video spot, I am an archaeologist, whose Spanish version has more than 8.000 visits. In the first anniversary of its publication, we have decided to share it worldwide in an international language.

Based on Archaeomanifesto’s idea ‘I encouraged others to follow my path’ we have looked for that special moment, timeless and universal, in which a boy discovers one of the diverse facets of Archaeology.

We’d like to dedicate this video to all those archaeologists who enjoy their profession. It is created to acknowledge our work, “underground and underwater, in the suffocating heat or with scarce resources…”; especially to reveal the role of Archaeology as a scientific labour, based on a complex research method, but a real vocation full of passion, however. Get to know us better.

I am an archaeologist‘ was recorded at The Santa Cruz Library, the historical library of the University of Valladolid with an international prestige (Valladolid, Spain).

Enjoy it!

The Future will be the Past

june 2014


Moving a site on Sanday – Bronze Age buildings, a well with steps, and much, much more.

Never assume you know what you’re going to find – sites always throw up surprises. SCAPE’s project with the Sanday Archaeology Group in Orkney is a perfect example… who thought we’d find a Bronze Age well during a reconstruction project!

Steps down into the well, with water at the bottom. ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Steps down into the well ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Our Day of Archaeology 2014 was very eventful, and to get an idea of the hive of activity, see a time lapse film of the first two hours on site. The Day came half way through our project on Sanday, where we were working with the local group to relocate a previously excavated Bronze Age site. Local residents had reported structures revealed on a beach after a storm, leading to an emergency evaluation (it was thought that there might be a burial within the stone tank). The excavation had showed the site to be one of only a handful of burnt mounds with surviving structures within them. After the excavation, the sea continued to attack the stone tank, orthostats and a corbelled cell, and the local group wanted to preserve something of the site by moving some of the stones to their newly opened Heritage Centre, away from the sea. The group contacted SCAPE’s Scotland’s Coastal Heritage at Risk Project – and a plan to relocate the stonework was devised as a ShoreDig project.

The Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk logo  ©SCAPE

The Scotland’s Coastal Heritage at Risk logo ©SCAPE

Before we could transfer the large stone slabs to the Heritage Centre, we had to reveal the masonry from under the beach cobbles. The original excavation had located a corbelled cell buried in the coastal section, but health and safety concerns had prevented full excavation. By the time we started digging in early July, the sea had eroded back the coast edge, allowing access the cell. After getting our Shetland stonemasons, Jim Keddie and Rick Barton, to check the structure, we excavated demolition and backfill material to reveal six steps leading down to an underground chamber.

Excavating the Bronze Age well on Sanday ©SCAPE

Excavating the Bronze Age well on Sanday ©SCAPE

The prehistoric structure stood three metres high to the top of its corbelled roof. The lower chamber was full of water; and the silt at the bottom of the well was full of remarkably well-preserved organic material (I’ve never seen Bronze Age seaweed before). Part of our Day of Archaeology was spent sampling the organic silts, bagging 100% of the material for future analysis.

Bronze Age seaweed from the well excavated on a beach, Sanday, Orkney. ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Bronze Age seaweed from the well excavated on a beach, Sanday, Orkney. ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Burnt mounds often have a large trough or tank, and in Scotland, some of these tanks are made of large, flat slabs of stone. We excavated the cut for the stone tank, finding that the base was far larger than the size of the tank – and that the four side-stones had been placed on the flat slab at the bottom.

Preparing to move the base slab of the stone tank.©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Preparing to move the base slab of the stone tank. ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Much of our Day of Archaeology was spent moving the last of the stones to the reconstruction site. We plotted the relative positions of the stones with an EDM; and photographed, numbered and drew all the stones before lifting them. Jo and Ellie from SCAPE worked with Sanday Archaeology Group members to prepare the site so that the stones could be lifted. A second team of local volunteers were ready with tractors, trailers, digger and slings to move the stones off site.

Moving stones from the site at Meur ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Moving stones from the site at Meur ©Tom Dawson/SCAPE

Once the base slab was lifted, we saw that it had been built over an earlier, possibly corbelled, structure, perhaps explaining why such a large stone was used. This was very unexpected, and we managed to capture the moment as part of the filming we were doing for possible inclusion in the next series of Digging for Britain.

Jo filming Tom while stones are moved in the background. ©Ellie Graham/SCAPE

Jo filming Tom on site. ©Ellie Graham/SCAPE

Our Day of Archaeology was a great success – to learn more about what we found, (and what was under the slab) visit our Facebook page; or follow us on Twitter.

Les Queyriaux : chronique d’une découverte exceptionnelle pour l’Inrap

Je m’appelle Carine Muller-Pelletier, pour ce “Day of Archaeology”, je souhaiterais vous parler d’une journée caractéristique de ma vie d’archéologue et du site archéologique des Queyriaux, près de Clermont-Ferrand, que j’ai fouillé pendant plus de un an.

Ambiance sérieuse dans le bureau: constitution de la documentation, plans et descriptions. © Julia Patouret, Inrap

Ambiance sérieuse dans le bureau: constitution de la documentation, plans et descriptions. © Julia Patouret, Inrap

5 h, allez debout. Je dois rendre un bilan scientifique des découvertes sur le site. Il faut au moins finir le chapitre entamé hier soir. J’ai beaucoup de chance, le chantier est à 15 mn. 7h30, j’ouvre le site. Déchargement du véhicule. Des collègues matinaux sont là pour m’aider. On installe le bureau.

8h, on attaque. Je fais le tour des questions, des soucis.
Première étape quotidienne. Je fais le tour du chantier. 28 000 m², les vestiges sont denses partout, la course commence. On fait le point avec chacun, sur chaque secteur.

Ceux en cours de décapage mécanique, ceux où les structures en creux sont coupées à la minipelle, ceux en cours de fouille planimétrique manuelle (Ouh, c’est magnifique), les relevés stratigraphiques.

Base du décapage mécanique et densité des structures en creux, aucun répit n’est possible ! © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Base du décapage mécanique et densité des structures en creux, aucun répit n’est possible ! © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Dégagement d’un vase du Néolithique moyen dans une fosse en train d’être coupée : on ressort la truelle qui prend le relai de la pelle mécanique. © Julia Patouret, Inrap

Dégagement d’un vase du Néolithique moyen dans une fosse en train d’être coupée : on ressort la truelle qui prend le relai de la pelle mécanique. © Julia Patouret, Inrap

Fouille planimétrique par quarts de mètre carré d’un sol d’occupation du Néolithique moyen, avec en premier plan un grand foyer à pierres chauffées. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Fouille planimétrique par quarts de mètre carré d’un sol d’occupation du Néolithique moyen, avec en premier plan un grand foyer à pierres chauffées. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

J’ai besoin de suivre tout ce qui se passe. Il est indispensable que j’aie une vision d’ensemble.
On fait parfois des réajustements, en fonction des vestiges trouvés la veille. Ils soulèvent certaines fois de nouvelles questions. Il faut trouver les méthodes adaptées pour y répondre. On se concerte. On confronte les points de vue. Je dois trancher rapidement, c’est mon rôle.
Les spécialistes se succèdent sur le site pour récolter les données nécessaires à l’élaboration du bilan scientifique. Il faut mettre en évidence clairement le potentiel scientifique du site : état de conservation, nature des vestiges, détermination typo-chronologique, aspects technologiques, premières propositions d’interprétation fonctionnelle des zones et d’organisation spatiale par phase chronologique. Et replacer tout ça dans ce qu’on connaît déjà et dans ce qu’on peut obtenir comme réponses aux questions encore en suspend.

Discussion et concertation (Je suis à droite !) © Julie Gerez, Inrap

Discussion et concertation (Je suis à droite !) © Julie Gerez, Inrap

18h00, j’enfile de nouveau mon costume de jeune maman, pour le quitter de nouveau vers 21h et poursuivre le bilan scientifique et intégrer les nouvelles données acquises dans la journée.

Une période intense de 3 mois, au cours de laquelle deux bilans scientifiques m’ont été demandés : (60 et 90 pages de travail habituellement effectué en post fouille). Mais le site méritait cet investissement.

Dégagements de fragments de terre cuite à empreintes de clayonnage qui constituaient le dôme d’argile qui s’est effondré d’un four du Néolithique moyen. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Dégagements de fragments de terre cuite à empreintes de clayonnage qui constituaient le dôme d’argile qui s’est effondré d’un four du Néolithique moyen. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

En effet, l’intérêt du site des Queyriaux réside dans la présence de sols d’occupation denses et structurés, remarquablement conservés, dans les habitats du Néolithique moyen chasséen et du Bronze moyen. L’abondance du matériel collecté, sa diversité et son excellente conservation renforcent la valeur du site. Il offrait donc une occasion rare de pouvoir connecter les aménagements enterrés aux sols de circulation jonchés des vestiges, qui révèlent une plus large palette des activités humaines. L’association de ces deux sources d’information complémentaires permettait d’envisager une reconstitution palethnographique plus fidèle de la vie quotidienne des habitants .

La répartition spatiale atteste une organisation de l’occupation, caractérisée par des zones délimitées et complémentaires, spécialisées dans différents types d’activités qui gravitent autour d’une zone centrale marquée par la présence de grands bâtiments. Nous avions les données nécessaires pour enrichir les connaissances encore très partielles sur les villages en contexte terrestre et aborder les questions du territoire d’exploitation, des modalités d’occupation du territoire et des réseaux d’échange des communautés et pour permettre un retour critique sur les modèles esquissés jusqu’alors.

Régionalement, le site constitue un objet d’étude inédit pour le Bronze moyen qui est une période mal connue.

Dégagement d’un animal déposé (carnivore) dans une fosse du Bronze moyen. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Dégagement d’un animal déposé (carnivore) dans une fosse du Bronze moyen. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

En revanche, les sites du Chasséen récent sont nombreux. Sur la plupart d’entre eux, la présence des sols d’occupation était attestée. Cependant, dans certains cas, ils n’ont pas été traités ; dans d’autres cas, plus rares, les sols n’ont pu être appréhendés que sur des surfaces restreintes. Aux Queyriaux, l’enjeu de la demande de classement comme découverte exceptionnelle résidait dans l’objectif d’obtenir enfin les moyens nécessaires à l’exploitation des sols d’occupation sur de vastes étendues.

Une portion d’un secteur de sol d’occupation néolithique en cours de fouille manuelle. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Une portion d’un secteur de sol d’occupation néolithique en cours de fouille manuelle. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Démontage d’un foyer à pierres chauffées et enregistrement des données. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Démontage d’un foyer à pierres chauffées et enregistrement des données. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Finalement, au bout de 5 mois d’opiniâtreté,  nous avons obtenu le classement du site en découverte d’importance exceptionnelle d’intérêt national pour le Néolithique moyen et l’âge du Bronze moyen, et nous avons passé 14 mois sur le terrain, au lieu des 6 initialement  prévus.
2000 m² de sols d’occupation, répartis sur 7 secteurs ont pu être fouillés, ainsi que les 4000 structures recensées sur le site. Nous avons ainsi traversé les saisons avec la rigueur scientifique constante qui s’imposait. En parallèle, la nécropole antique qui bordait la voie romaine a été fouillée intégralement.

Le tamisage à l’eau des sédiments prélevés lors de la fouille des sols n’a jamais cessé, même dans les conditions les plus rude© Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Le tamisage à l’eau des sédiments prélevés lors de la fouille des sols n’a jamais cessé, même dans les conditions les plus rudes© Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

le retour de la belle saison. © Marcel Brizard, Inrap

le retour de la belle saison. © Marcel Brizard, Inrap

Et chaque jour, malgré le stress et la fatigue, je me rendais sur le site avec la même émotion. Je me disais que nous avions tellement de chance de pourvoir travailler sur un site aussi magnifique, j’avais conscience de vivre un grand moment dans ma vie d’archéologue, qui ne se reproduirait peut-être pas. Les premiers résultats des études viennent confirmer ce que nous avions pressenti sur le terrain, c’est une grande satisfaction.

Les trous et les tas au dernier soir de a fouille. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

Les trous et les tas au dernier soir de la fouille. © Carine Muller-Pelletier, Inrap

 

Carine Muller-Pelletier, archéologue à l’Inrap

 Lire la version anglaise du texte / Read the english translation

Découvrir la vidéo : Un village néolithique dans le Puy-de-Dôme

The Curious Loneliness of the Director of Archaeology

Have you ever seen, on TV or on the Web, videos about archaeology, leaving aside documentaries?
Probably not if you live in Italy.

Have you ever seen an archaeologist recording with a camera?
Probably not if you live in Italy.

I’m an Italian archaeologist and when I don’t dig I edit videos recorded during the excavation (when I’m too tired for studying…).
I’m also a video-narration/storytelling enthusiast, and these two interests mixed together led me to produce footage like this, a docudrama that performs the 2011 excavation season in the Roman site of Vignale (Italy).

My archaeological life so far has been a mix of university studies, excavations and recording videos. But communicating fieldwork is my favorite activity and I like to do it via video, especially referring to the point of view of the archaeologists, translated in a story using the genre of docudrama. Putting together images and sounds/voices, in my opinion video is the best medium for telling histories of archaeology, from the most famous to the worst preserved site. I think video can become a fundamental way of communication and involvement, raising public awareness of archaeological fieldwork.
This summer seems to be not so different from the others, even if more satisfactory until now. In June, Giuliano De Felice and I won the first Italian video contest about archaeology, organized by Mappa Project, with this short video about Open Access in archaeology (not subtitled yet). It has been absolutely terrific winning this contest with a dialogue instead of the usual 3D models or documentary.

Later on, I’ve started a new column about video-narration in archaeology on “Archeologia tardoantica e medievale a Siena” Facebook page. Every week I review one or two videos from all over the world that are characterized by a special care about narration; from this derives the name of the column “Making archaeology as a movie“.

Today archaeology covers a wide variety of works and specialisms. Video-communication is not among the most popular at all and sometimes I feel I’m doing it for myself and a few other people (and always gratis!). But this doesn’t mean that is less important and less necessary. It’s part of the archaeological process and I’m going on doing it, trying to achieve a better and more involving communication of the fieldwork.

recording in vignale

I will spend my Day of Archaeology 2013 at home, editing videos but most of all studying boring books. Therefore I’m impatiently waiting for the new excavation season in Vignale, next September, when I can experience something new about video during fieldwork and resume the dig. This is definitely my favorite way for celebrating a great Day of Archaeology.

Community archaeology and multimedia – historic graves


Community archaeology is done by teams which include archaeologists – archaeologists are not the leads – they collaborate and contribute. Caimin O’Brien of the National Monuments Service and Bernie Goldbach of LIT have encouraged Eachtra  to develop the use of off-the-shelf technology in community surveys of historic graveyards. Farmers, school children from 10-16, and a wide range of community members have all had a hand in generating hyperlocal heritage videos using digital cameras in general and the iPod Touch in particular. Add iMovie to the Touch and videos can be recorded, edited and published all without the intervention of a laptop or desktop computer. Heritage media production is now in the hands of the community.